Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3

Intel Processor Comparison – Part 7 of 16

As Core 2 Duo technology has been here for some time, Core i3 is targetted to replace Core 2 Duo in the market pretty soon. Both Core 2 Duo and Core i3 are dual core processors and can run two processes at the same time. The main difference between these two is the number of threads. Two cores on Core 2 Duo are single threaded while Core i3 has a dual thread running capability on each core. Hence total number of threads that can run on Core 2 Duo is 2 and 4 threads in total can run on Core i3.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad

Intel Processor Comparison – Part 6 of 16

Core 2 Duo is a dual core processor and can run two independent processes at the same time. It can run two processes at a time. Hence, total number of parallel threads that can run on Core 2 Duo is 2.

Core 2 Quad is a quad core processor. That means that four different processors are built into one processor chip and can run four different processes at the same time. There can be 4 parallel processes that this processor can execute.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Difference Between Thread and Process

Intel Processor Comparison – Part 5 of 16

Every program that runs on your computer is basically a separate Process. Processes are independent running programs on your computer. They have their independent memory, variables, resources and they participate in competing for using the CPU time. Once you boot your PC, it runs several processes at the same time and once you have only one processor (on a single core computer) you will run only one Process at the same time.

One thread may want to run several parallel tasks at the same time. For example a sofware downloading a file may have one thread receiving data from network, another thread saving the downloaded data on the disk and another thread to display the download status on the screen. Threads use the common memory space and variables defined within a process and can talk to other threads within the same process. You can create threads without spending too much of memory or processing power while processes required significant resources to be spent when creating a new process. Last but not least, threads do not participate in the competition for using the CPU, rather whenever the process containing these threads executes, these threads get a chance to execute.

Threads can easily talk to the parent process and other threads within the same process. Processes can only talk to other processes through an external communication channel named IPC (Inter process communication).

Above description will help understanding the difference between the processors under discussion.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Intel – Hyper Threading Technology

Intel Processor Comparison – Part 4 or 16

Intel’s Hyper threading technology dates back to the days of the single core processors. Intel’s single core processors initially got the capability of running two threads at the same time instead of running two processes in parallel. This can be a tricky fact and we’ll compare threads and processes in the next section. Hyper threading technology is useful and has continued to be available off an on in the newer processors as well.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introductio
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM firs
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Intel – Processor Flashback

Processor Comparison – Part 3 of 16

Most of us have been using those good old single core processors. Then Intel came up with their dual core technology. Dual core means, you have physically two processors that are soldered together into one microprocessor. They work independently and you actually have two processors working in your computer.

Then came a wave of processors including Cor 2 Quad, Core i3, Core i5 and Core i7 that people started losing clue of, how exactly these processors are better than the typical Core 2 duo. There are technical architectural level changes that we may not be able to discuss, and those who are interested in a detailed comparison, can go through the table at the bottom of this post. But we will discuss the main changes in this post.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback (This Page)
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

More RAM is more important than Processor

Intel Processors Comparison – Part 2 of 16

Intel During our discussion of finding a faster processor and comparison between different processors, it is important that first of all, we make sure that having more RAM is a must to have a great computing experience. Though processors are always busy and anything and everything that happens in your computer, needs to go through the CPU, importance of large RAM can never be neglected. So if you have a computer that you think is slow, simply go buy some more RAM and try out your good old PC performing much better. This is the cheapest way of improving your computing experience.

This article is part of a series of articles listed below

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first (This Page)
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Intel Processor Comparison

Intel Processors Comparison – Part 1 of 16

Core 2 Duo vs Core 2 Quad vs Core i7 vs Core i5 vs Core i3

Several people have been asking me this question and I had this research pending for a quite a few days now. In this article, I will discuss about the comparison between different processor technologies by Intel. This looks like a very technical question but when you go to buy a desktop or a laptop computer, this turns out to be a core question.

To make things look simple I’ve broken this introduction down into following topics. You can go ahead and read the section that interests you the most.

  1. Intel Processor Comparison – Introduction (This Page)
  2. Want a faster PC, get more RAM first
  3. Processor Flashback
  4. Hyper Threading Technology
  5. Difference between Thread and Process
  6. Difference between Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad
  7. Difference Between Core 2 Duo and Core i3
  8. Difference Between Core 2 Quad and Core i5
  9. Intel Turbo Boost Technology
  10. Difference Between Core i3 and Core i5
  11. Difference Between Core i5 and Core i7
  12. Differences Between Core 2 and Core i Technologies
  13. Difference Between FSB and DMI
  14. Difference Between Smart Cache and L2 Cache
  15. Processor Comparison Bottom Line
  16. Processor Comparison Table

Crysis 2 by Electronic Arts- Coming in 2010

I know 2010 holidays are three quarters away but EA’s announcement and this promo video forced me to force about Crysis 2. Crysis 2 is coming to PC, Xbox 360 and PS3 platform by end of this year. Crysis has been a benchmark for the enthusiast PC gamers pushing the graphics to the limits and challenging the GPU capabilities. Here’s the video for you, that made me jump out of my chair.

For more information, see the official Crysis site Site: http://www.sosnewyork.com/en_US

Monitor Power Consumption – CRT vs LCD

This is a known fact that CRT monitors take more  power as compared to the LCDs.

If you have a CRT monitor, the big monitor with the bloated tail and a few KGs weight, you are consuming the most power. The power consumption of a CRT monitor ranges from 100watts to 300 watts depending on the size, model and make of the monitor. Typically, the older models used to consume more power and newer ones are better in terms of power consumption.

If you have a flatter variant of a screen that could be a TFT, LCD, LED or Plasma screen, you are using less power as compared to the CRT monitors. Most of the laptops, hand held devices like pdas and mobile phones are using this kind of displays these days. If you are using LCD, TFT or LED monitor for your computer as external display, your typical power consumption is somewhere between 50 watts to 200 watts depending on the size. For example this 15” LCD I have consumes 55 watts. There can be screens that take even less power.

This worksheet provides a more quantitative way of calculating your poswer consumption depending on different monitors you are using.

http://downloads.techrepublic.com.com/5138-10589-5698031.html?tag=content%3bleftCol

See more articles on Green Computing at home and office.

Memory Myth


I’ve been using different memory cards in different devices. I’ve used MMCs, SD, MicroSD, Sony Memory stick and so on. I never bothered re-checking their capacity and trusted on the label on the card itself. I have been using a 2GB MMC-Mobile in my good old N72 and I never went into the phone’s memory monitoring software to see actually how much memory is available on the card. Recenly I got a SanDisk’s 16GB SDHC card and when I plugged it into my Nokia N82, it reports it as 15GB. Thats loss of a whole GB of data capacity. Then I plugged it into my BlackBerry and found that it reports it to be 14.8GB. Another 200MB lost. Then I decided to actually try a few other cards around. I investigated a little further. I plugged my 8GB Micro-SDHC card in my BlackBerry and it reported it to be 7.6 GB. Thats again not 8GB. Then I plugged a common 1GB Micro-SDHC card into my Nokia N82 and it reports it to be 964 MB.

The key point is, I never noticed the capacity loss on 1GB card because its only 60MB. While on a 16GB card its losing a whole 1.2GB.

Why is that happening? I revisitied my basic data capacity and storage unit concepts. Let me list down a few basic facts for you.

1 kilo-byte = 1kB = 1024 bytes
1 megabyte = 1MB = 1024kB = 1024×1024 bytes
1 gigabyte = 1GB = 1024MB = 1024x1024x1024 bytes

Therefore
16GB = 16 x 1024 x 1024 x 1024 bytes.

In reality, what memory card manufacturers do, they put it as follows:

1 GB card has slightly more than 1000,000,000 bytes.
It s hould actually be 1073,741,824

Similarly, 16 GB card actually has 16,000,000,000 bytes. This makes the total to 14.90GB

So if you buy 1GB, you should expect actully something less than that.

The thing which is bothering me is, my Nokia reports my 16 GB card as 15GB, while my BlackBerry reports it as 14.8, while it actually is 14.9 GB.

I’m pretty close in above calculation, but where do you think I’m going wrong?